To be or not to bee. The bee-moth or hummingbird-hawk moth is back.

What’s growing in your garden?

The bee moth, also known as the hummingbird hawk moth is here again. I look forward to its annual dusk time visits. I have to be quick with my camera for this moth never lingers for too long.  It clearly favors the colour purple: African lilies [Agapanthus] and verbena [Verbena bonariensis] and larkspur [Delphinium]  -which is toxic to us. I have seen them sip up the nectar of pink zinnias and cosmos, so perhaps they are a bit partial to these flowers. To be honest, this hawkmoth does look hover like a hummingbird and hum like a bee.

Agapanthus, verbena and cosmos attract hawk moths.
Agapanthus, verbena, zinnias, larkspur, and cosmos attract hawk moths.
The hawk moth looks dull when sipping.
The hawk moth looks dull when sipping/at rest.
The proboscis of the hawk moth is curled under its chin in flight.
The long proboscis of the hawk moth is curled under its chin in flight.
The mouth of an Himalayan caterpillar up close with cobra-like markings
The mouth of a caterpillar up close with cobra-like markings
Caterpillar hanging upside down whilst feeding on a leaf
Caterpillar hanging on un-delicately whilst feeding on a potato creeper.  Note the tail.

Watch the hawk moth:

Watch the hawk moth caterpillar on my YouTube channel. 

My friend and India’s leading lepidopterist, Peter Smetacek calls butterflies and moths bio-indicator species. Read about him: https://www.woodstockschool.in/hovers-like-a-hummingbird-looks-like-a-bee/

 

 

 

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