Tigress, Tigress Burning Bright

William Blake knew what he was talking about when he penned his poem, The Tiger. I saw this beautiful tigress scent her territory in Corbett, seemingly unperturbed by jeep loads of tourists capturing her every move. It was around 3-4pm , her coat looked like it was aflame in the dappled light. She confidently strolled ahead of us scenting every tree – letting us know we were trespassing.

Watch her on my You Tube channel:

 

The Tiger by William Blake.

TIGER, tiger, burning bright

In the forests of the night,

What immortal hand or eye

Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

 

In what distant deeps or skies

Burnt the fire of thine eyes?

On what wings dare he aspire?

What the hand dare seize the fire?

 

And what shoulder and what art

Could twist the sinews of thy heart?

And when thy heart began to beat,

What dread hand and what dread feet?

 

What the hammer? what the chain?

In what furnace was thy brain?

What the anvil? What dread grasp

Dare its deadly terrors clasp?

 

When the stars threw down their spears,

And water’d heaven with their tears,

Did He smile His work to see?

Did He who made the lamb make thee?

 

Tiger, tiger, burning bright

In the forests of the night,

What immortal hand or eye

Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

Snapshot 3 (1-31-2016 6-35 PM)-3

 

 

Himalayan Cuckoo Atop A Deodar

#HimalayanCuckoo

This beautiful cuckoo graced the deodar outside for just a few minutes. The call was a distinct giveaway but I wasn’t fast enough to capture it. The video and stills were shot through a glass door so they’re not very sharp.

Watch my video:http://youtu.be/2j56MpEaimc

Cuckoo (himalayan)
Himalayan_Cuckoo_atop_a_Himalayan_Cedar
#HimalayanCuckoo
#HimalayanCuckoo(Cuculus saturatus)

Related sites: Click on the link to hear cuckoo calls: Via xeno_cantohttp://www.xeno-canto.org/species/Cuculus-saturatus

Via wiki:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Himalayan_cuckoo

Hippotion Celerio Hawk-Moth. Nocturnal Visitor In My Garden

At sundown a few evenings ago, I saw what I thought were two bees around my flower pots. They were still there an hour later. On taking a closer look I realised there were moths, though quite different from the hawk moth that I was familiar with. I took the camera out in time to get a few shots before nightfall. It wasn’t easy as these moths were flitting around like they couldn’t make up their minds; barely hovering over a flower for a second or so.  Peter Smetacek, a lepidopterist-friend, helped me id the moths. Peter is one of India’s experts when it comes to butterflies and moths and has got a whole lot of us “infected” as he says, with his passion for the flutterby.

The  Hippotion  Celerio is also called the Vine hawk moth or Silver striped Hawk moth. With summer flowers blooming, I hope I get to see more of the Sphingidae family.

Read more about Hawk Moths and Peter via Woodstock School:http://www.woodstockschool.in/hovers-like-a-hummingbird-looks-like-a-bee/

#Hippotion_celerio _or _Vine_Hawk_Moth
#Hippotion_celerio _or _Vine_Hawk_Moth
#Hippotion_celerio _or _Vine_Hawk_Moth
Also known as Silver-striped Hawk-moth
#Hippotion_celerio _or _Vine_Hawk_Moth
Hovering for a drink

Related article on the Vine moth via wiki:.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippotion_celerio

Here's another  Hawk moth
Here’s another  Hawk moth
#Hawk-moth
Are moths attracted to shades of pink and purple?

Himalayan Wild Flower Rhapsody

   Wild flowers from the Himalayan states of Uttarakhand, Himachal Pradesh, Kashmir and Ladakh.

Some grow at 7000 ft while a few of these are alpine flowers that I came across on treks at around 12,000-14,000 ft.

Rhododendron
Rhododendron. Locals make juice and jam with the petals
Seen at Bekal Tal
Seen at Bekal Tal
Daphne
Daphne. The bark is used to make paper. 
Pedicularis
Pedicularis
Kind of Thistle
Kind of Thistle: Onopordum acanthium?
Fan Kamal/Saussurea graminifolia
Fan Kamal/Saussurea graminifolia
Potentilla
Potentilla
                          Brahma Kamal/Saussurea obvallata
Brahma Kamal/Saussurea obvallata
Field of  Bistorta
Field of  Bistorta
Fungi not flower but so pretty...wild mushrooms
Fungi not flower but so pretty…wild mushrooms on a rotting tree trunk.                                            
Zephyranthes
Zephyranthes

Wild Jackals In My Backyard

Pup
'Mama' Himalayan Jackal<br />Canis aureus indicus
‘Mama’ Himalayan Jackal
Canis aureus indicus

When my son walked the dogs a few days ago, he spotted a pack of Jackals with pups. It has been raining incessantly. I wasn’t quite ready to battle the leeches and the cold Himalayan rain to check them out just then. When the weather cleared, I grabbed my camera and was lucky to see the ‘Mama’ with 4-5 pups frolicking in the shrubs like dogs do. The pups looked like they were a month or two old. They seemed oblivious to my presence and I watched them as long as I could…shooting movies and stills on my digital camera. Himalayan jackals here seem rather gentle. They never made a sound; perhaps this is survival tactic! Last year, we had three of them come right up to the path near our house and sit around looking perfectly at ease. My dogs (large Gaddi mixes) nearly broke our front door trying to get at them.

But then two nights ago, I heard pup-like, heart-wrenching cries that lasted a few seconds. All went quiet after that. Had the leopard got one of them? I hope not. I never spotted them again; I hope ‘Mama’ has moved them to a safer place.

Mama & pup
Mama & pup
Pups
Pups
Mama on the lookout
Mama on the lookout
Visitors from last year
Visitors from last year
Backyard jackals
Backyard jackals